::


:: PoliticsWatch Archives

> Frontpage
> Recent News
> News Archive
> Recent  Features 
> Features Archive


:: Inside PoliticsWatch

> Contact PoliticsWatch


:: PoliticsWatch News

Duceppe weighs his options with Boisclair gone

[PoliticsWatch updated 5:00 p.m. May 8, 2007]

OTTAWA  — Those waiting for Bloc Quebecois leader Gilles Duceppe to announce his plans to leave Ottawa and seek the leadership of the Parti Quebeois will have to wait another day.   

Duceppe was reluctant to discuss his political future in the wake of Parti Quebecois leader Andre Boisclair's announcement in Quebec City earlier on Tuesday that he is resigning as party leader. 

"It's not the time to make decisions," he told reporters in French after question period. He added that it was Boisclair's day, not his. 

"I respect the decision. I think it was a noble decision, not an easy decision to be taken. It's very tough in politics." 

But one of the few clues Duceppe offered about his future was how he did not object to a reporter's hypothetical question about what happens to the Bloc if he were to leave and seek Boisclair's job. 

"I'm very confident," he said, noting the Bloc's demise is predicted almost every six months. "We have a lot of resources, good members in the Bloc and I'm very optimistic for the Bloc." 

In 2005, Duceppe was being drafted to seek the leadership of the Parti Quebecois but decided to sit out the leadership race which Boisclair eventually won. 

However, most observers in Ottawa and Quebec City believe that Duceppe will enter provincial politics this time and be the heavy favourite to replace Boisclair. 

Duceppe has been an MP for 17 years and leader of the Bloc for four federal elections spanning 10 years. 

His expected departure will definitely change the dynamics of the next federal election and the minority Parliament. 

If he were to leave, the Bloc would have to hold a leadership campaign to replace the experienced Duceppe and that could take as much a year before a new leader is chosen and gets settled in as party leader. 

Because all three opposition parties have to vote against the government on confidence votes for there to be an election, Prime Minister Stephen Harper appears to be the big winner as he will once again have one of the opposition parties unable to go the polls for up to another year and propping up his government.

However, NDP leader Jack Layton said he doesn't expect a Bloc leadership campaign to make much difference on the dynamic of the House.

"The Bloc's been propping up this government for quite some time," he said, noting that  the separatist party supported the Conservative  government on the last two budgets and the softwood lumber deal, all of which were confidence votes. 

Liberal leader Stephane Dion reserved comment on how Duceppe's departure would affect the dynamic of the Commons. 

"I will comment about Mr. Duceppe's move if there is a move," he said. 

: Related Links

> Opposition MP likens Canadian PM to a dictator 

© PoliticsWatch® 2007. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PoliticsWatch content, including by framing, copying, linking or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Public Interests Research and Communications Inc. (PIRCINC). PoliticsWatch is registered trademark of PIRCINC.

> More Recent PoliticsWatch News...







:: Got a News Tip?

Call the PoliticsWatch
tip-line at 613.232.0516
or
e-mail

 

PoliticsWatch Home  |  News Services  Voter Resources  |  Research Base

© PoliticsWatch® 2007. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PoliticsWatch content, 
including by framing, copying, linking or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of 
Public Interests Research and Communications Inc. (PIRCINC). PoliticsWatch is registered trademark of PIRCINC.
PoliticsWatch® | Canada's Political Portal™
85 Albert Street, Suite 1502, Ottawa ON K1P 6A4 |  phone: 613.232.0516
news@politicswatch.com  |  Terms of Service, Copyright, Trademarks, and Disclaimers Statement