::


:: PoliticsWatch Archives

> Frontpage
> Recent News
> News Archive
> Recent  Features 
> Features Archive


:: Inside PoliticsWatch

> Contact PoliticsWatch


:: PoliticsWatch News

Bush, Harper amused by SPP critics

[PoliticsWatch updated 4:30 p.m. August 21, 2007]

Prime Minister Stephen Harper and U.S. President George W. Bush converse outside Le Chateau Montebello. 

OTTAWA  —  Both Prime Minister Stephen Harper and U.S. President George W. Bush described some of the critics of the North American Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP) as comical at the close of a two-day summit in Montebello, Quebec.   

Security was high at the summit site and on Monday some protestors trying to disrupt the meeting of North American leaders clashed with police who used tear gas to disperse the crowd.  

The SPP is the target of critics from the left and right side of the political spectrum. They argue the process is secretive and designed to create a North American union with a common currency and even a North American Superhighway. 

"I'm amused by the difference between what actually takes place in the meetings and what some are trying to say what takes place," Bush said at the leaders' closing press conference. "It's quite comical actually when you realize the difference between reality and what some people are saying on TV about this."

Bush said summit critics were using old-fashioned political scare tactics "where you lay out a conspiracy and force people to try to prove it doesn't exist."

While on a world stage, Harper used the press conference to mock summit critics, including Liberal leader Stephane Dion and NDP leader Jack Layton

Prime Minister Stephen Harper and  Mexican President Felipe Calderon. 

On Friday, the Prime Minister's Office told PoliticsWatch that Dion should "stop with the conspiracy theory" after the Liberal leader alleged at a news conference that Canada and the U.S. were involved in discussions on bulk water exports.  

Harper used a similar tone when speaking with reporters on Tuesday.

"A couple of my opposition leaders have speculated on massive water diversions and superhighways to the continent maybe interplanetary, I'm not sure, as well," Harper said at the summit news conference. 

"There were reports of a former prime minister lurking in the hallways. I have yet to see him," he added in a reference to a Canadian Press story that reported Layton said former prime minister Paul Martin had been invited to the summit. 

Harper said the leaders discussed practical and pragmatic issues related to the trilateral trading relationship.  

This includes mundane items, such as a CEO who Harper said earlier told the leaders he wanted to standardize jelly bean ingredients in Canada and the U.S. 

"Is the sovereignty of Canada going to fall apart if we standardize the jelly bean?" the prime minister asked. "I don't think so. Maybe Mr. Dion thinks so."

U.S. President George W. Bush is greeted by Governor General Michaelle Jean upon arriving at Ottawa International Airport. 

Mexican President Felipe Calderon said there were "several myths about this meeting." 

"Some are more jovial and funnier than others," he said. 

The summit closed Tuesday with Harper announcing the leaders had agreed that they must "identify and stop unsafe goods from entering our countries, especially those designed for our children." 

Canada and the U.S. have recently had a string of recalls of counterfeit and contaminated consumer goods from countries such as China

Meanwhile, Canada and the U.S. have been unable to bridge their differing opinions of Canada's claim on the Northwest Passage.  

"We believe it's an international passage way," Bush said. "Having said that, the United States does not question Canadian sovereignty over its Arctic islands and the United States supports Canadian investments that have been made to exercise its sovereignty."

Harper again reiterated his commitment to promote an Arctic sovereignty agenda. 

"Canada is fully committed to strengthening its Arctic sovereignty on every level -- not just military, but economic, social environmental, any other method, any other means," he said. 

The next so-called Three Amigos summit will take place at Bush's Crawford Ranch in Texas in 2008. It will be the last such summit for Bush, the longest serving of the the three North American leaders. 

:  Related Links

> Bush and Harper to discuss Arctic sovereignty, dangerous imports and Iran

© PoliticsWatch® 2006. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PoliticsWatch content, including by framing, copying, linking or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Public Interests Research and Communications Inc. (PIRCINC). PoliticsWatch is registered trademark of PIRCINC.

> More Recent PoliticsWatch News...







:: Got a News Tip?

Call the PoliticsWatch
tip-line at 613.232.0516
or
e-mail

 

PoliticsWatch Home  |  News Services  Voter Resources  |  Research Base

© PoliticsWatch® 2004. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PoliticsWatch content, 
including by framing, copying, linking or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of 
Public Interests Research and Communications Inc. (PIRCINC). PoliticsWatch is registered trademark of PIRCINC.
PoliticsWatch® | Canada's Political Portal™
85 Albert Street, Suite 1502, Ottawa ON K1P 6A4 |  phone: 613.232.0516
news@politicswatch.com  |  Terms of Service, Copyright, Trademarks, and Disclaimers Statement