::


:: PoliticsWatch Archives

> Frontpage
> Recent News
> News Archive
> Recent  Features 
> Features Archive


:: Inside PoliticsWatch

> Contact PoliticsWatch


:: PoliticsWatch News

Brison says Tories not entitled to air "entitlements" ad

[PoliticsWatch Updated 5:30 p.m. January 4, 2006]

Public Works Minister Scott Brison calls this Globe and Mail front page a "flat-out lie.". 

OTTAWA  — Public Works Minister Scott Brison is calling on the Conservatives to withdraw their latest television advertisement called "Entitlements" because he says it is misleading. 
 

The ad first aired on Monday and features actors in bars and restaurants watching older, wood-paneled television sets with Prime Minister Paul Martin, Justice John Gomery and former cabinet minister David Dingwall on screen and commenting on Liberal scandals.

The Tories have argued that the ad is not an attack ad because it merely restates facts on the public record.

This includes the front-page of the May 10, 2005 Globe and Mail that featured a large headline reading "Martin Liberals took illicit cash, probe told."

That headline came a day after former Liberal party executive Benoit Corbeil testified at the Gomery inquiry he handed out $50,000 in cash payments in envelopes to nine Liberal party officials before the 2000 election. 

Corbeil said he received the cash from Jean Brault of Groupaction, a major sponsorship program beneficiary. 

In statement from the Liberal war room Brison is saying the ad is a "flat-out lie" that was "dismissed" by Gomery. 

Corbeil was one of the few witnesses to name people associated with the Martin wing of the Liberal party. 

But like most testimony or documents that suggested Martin had more knowledge then he had publicly stated about the sponsorship program, Gomery deemed it useless. 

"I have to come to the conclusion that Mr. Corbeil is a fundamentally untruthful witness and that nothing that he says is worthy of belief," Gomery said in his fact-finding report.

It is the second Tory ad so far in the campaign that features the May 10th Globe front page. 

Brison said he doubts the Tories will pull the ad. 

"The party that accused Paul Martin of supporting child pornography, tried to link the Liberals to organized crime and is in the midst of a groundless witch-hunt against Ralph Goodale isn't likely to do the right thing here," he said. 

Tories pass Liberals in polls, online Tories get nervous

Wednesday's SES Research daily tracking poll - which the blogosphere likes to call the "daily crack" - has the Conservatives ahead of the Liberals for the first time in the election campaign by a margin of 36 to 33. 

You'd think the conservative blogosphere would be dancing in the snow-covered streets after this result. 

Instead, there is a sense of panic, if you can believe it.

In a post called "Fearing the Spectre of a Conservative Majority," on the blog The High Places, a blogger writes "While I am hopeful, I find myself deathly afraid of overexuberance. The way I see it, if the Tories gain any more in the polls, the backlash will begin."

At Andrewcoyne.com, one commenter wrote: "Good news but it's still too early to make any bold predictions. It seems - if last election is any indication - that Canadians enjoy to flirt with the Tories but when all is said and done cast their vote for Liberals."

At the opinion forum Free Dominion one poster writes in a poll thread: "Normally, I'd say Polls Schmolls but I'm actually a bit concerned about this poll. I think the CPC is peaking too soon … Now all eyes will be on Harper for the remainder of the campaign. Martin's attacks will focus all on Harper. The media will now focus on Harper."

Conservative supporters in the world of the blogs are a tortured sort. When a poll shows the Liberals ahead, a lot of them question the polling company's methodology or financial links to the Liberals. Now when a poll shows the Tories ahead, they worry about peaking too soon and a backlash. 

: Related Links

> ElectionWatch

© PoliticsWatch® 2005. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PoliticsWatch content, including by framing, copying, linking or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Public Interests Research and Communications Inc. (PIRCINC). PoliticsWatch is registered trademark of PIRCINC.

> More Recent PoliticsWatch News...







:: Got a News Tip?

Call the PoliticsWatch
tip-line at 613.232.0516
or
e-mail

 

PoliticsWatch Home  |  News Services  Voter Resources  |  Research Base

© PoliticsWatch® 2004. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PoliticsWatch content, 
including by framing, copying, linking or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of 
Public Interests Research and Communications Inc. (PIRCINC). PoliticsWatch is registered trademark of PIRCINC.
PoliticsWatch® | Canada's Political Portal™
85 Albert Street, Suite 1502, Ottawa ON K1P 6A4 |  phone: 613.232.0516
news@politicswatch.com  |  Terms of Service, Copyright, Trademarks, and Disclaimers Statement