::


:: PoliticsWatch Archives

> Frontpage
> Recent News
> News Archive
> Recent  Features 
> Features Archive


:: Inside PoliticsWatch

> Contact PoliticsWatch


:: PoliticsWatch News

Harper and Tories headed for a minority 

[PoliticsWatch Updated 11:00 p.m. January 23, 2006]

OTTAWA  — Conservative Leader Stephen Harper has been declared the winner by all three English-language networks in Monday night's federal election.  

Harper and the Conservatives are leading or picking up seats in Quebec and key Ontario battlegrounds.  

Harper's win will end 12 years of Liberal party domination of the House of Commons.

While Harper has a minority, he appears to have a smaller minority than Paul Martin won in the 2004 election campaign. 

However, the Liberals and the NDP do not have enough seats to control the balance of power. 

Harper's allies were confident that they will have a mandate and can govern even though they may be 30 seats short of the 155 needed to control the House of Commons. 

"I don't think anybody is the mood for a quick election," said Conservative campaign chair John Reynolds when asked about how long a Harper government can survive.

The Tories were powered by a strong showing in Quebec, where they are currently leading or winning in 10 seats. 

Conservative candidates Lawrence Cannon, Josee Verner and Maxime Bernier are among the winners. All have been touted as shoo-ins for a Harper cabinet. 

Jean-Pierre Blackburn, a former Mulroney cabinet minister, was a surprise winner in Quebec on Monday night. 

The question remains now, what will become of Liberal Leader Paul Martin? 

"He's going to have to reflect carefully on the results," former Liberal cabinet minister John Manley told CBC News.

"Perhaps he'll want to talk to his caucus and some of the candidates that were defeated and decide whether he wants to continue another day. With a minority government, we don't know when we might face another trip to the polls."

"Mr. Martin is going to have to consider all of his possibilities." 

Martin loyalists are also in trouble. 

CTV News is reporting that Government House Leader Tony Valeri has lost to the NDP in his Hamilton Stoney Creek riding. And Deputy Prime Minister Anne McLellan has lost in Edmonton. And Treasury Board President Reg Alcock is  trailing in Winnipeg South.

Liberal cabinet minister Carolyn Bennett appears to have won in a tough race against Tory star candidate Peter Kent and NDP star candidate Paul Summerville in the bellwether riding of St. Paul's. 

Toronto will remain largely Liberal, with the Grits winning or leading in 20 of 23 ridings. Ken Dryden and Bill Graham are among the Liberal ministers to hang on to their seats. And Liberal candidate Michael Ignatieff won in the bellwether riding of Etobicoke -- Lakeshore.

The Liberals also lost seats in Quebec, including Liberal MP Francois Boivin in the Liberal stronghold of Gatineau, who lost to Richard Nadeau of the Bloc.
In Montreal, Liberal cabinet ministers Liza Frulla and Pierre Pettigrew are trailing.

In Ottawa, John Baird, a former cabinet minister in the provincial Harris government, was victorious for the Tories in Ottawa West -- Nepean. But star candidate Allan Cutler has been defeated by Liberal David McGuinty in Ottawa South. And NDP candidate Paul Dewar is leading Martin loyalist Richard Mahoney in Ottawa Centre.

Independent Quebec candidate Andre Arthur has been declared the winner. 

: Related Links

> ElectionWatch

© PoliticsWatch® 2005. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PoliticsWatch content, including by framing, copying, linking or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Public Interests Research and Communications Inc. (PIRCINC). PoliticsWatch is registered trademark of PIRCINC.

> More Recent PoliticsWatch News...







:: Got a News Tip?

Call the PoliticsWatch
tip-line at 613.232.0516
or
e-mail

 

PoliticsWatch Home  |  News Services  Voter Resources  |  Research Base

© PoliticsWatch® 2004. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PoliticsWatch content, 
including by framing, copying, linking or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of 
Public Interests Research and Communications Inc. (PIRCINC). PoliticsWatch is registered trademark of PIRCINC.
PoliticsWatch® | Canada's Political Portal™
85 Albert Street, Suite 1502, Ottawa ON K1P 6A4 |  phone: 613.232.0516
news@politicswatch.com  |  Terms of Service, Copyright, Trademarks, and Disclaimers Statement